Drumcondra Redidence

Originally built in 1921, the Drumcondra Residence is a Californian Bungalow of rough cast render over brickwork with a terra cotta tiled roof. While the original six rooms were in excellent condition, with many of the internal features, fine examples of the era. The rear ‘skillion’ was typically run down and failed to take any advantage of the generous and uplifting outdoor spaces.

The design brief for the project was to provide a kitchen, meals and family area that captured natural light and warmth, with views and access to the rear garden. A ‘breezeway’ was designed to link the old house to the new wing, thereby providing circulation space and a new entrance to the home, before entering the generous, warm, light filled kitchen, dining and living spaces. A decision was also made to keep the existing laundry and external WC and to transform these spaces into new laundry and second bathroom, thus maximising the garden spaces and reducing the area that needed to be added to the house. With a small amount of re-planning within the existing home, the former kitchen became a separate study and guest bedroom. A large double garage completes the home and creates an overall finished project that will serve our client well for decades to come.

The roof line of the original house was left intact with the low roof and ceiling of the breezeway connected the taller spaces of the old and new parts of the house. The new wing provides a subtle contrast with the old in form and materials, although the smooth render detailing is repeated in wide timber battens to the new fibre cement cladding.

Energy saving measures include:
  • double glazing to all windows
  • a concrete slab with limestone tiled finish
  • high levels of insulation
  • zoning of areas
  • hydronic heating
  • energy efficient lighting
  • a vine covered pergola that is rapidly providing filtered light and shade to the large north facing windows


Water Saving Measures Include:
  • a small water tank
  • a simple grey water diversion system